Tag Archives: sw

Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

In the Beginning

Since the beginning of time…or at least since 1966, Menominee has run the single wing under Ken Hofer. In the late 1960’s, 1970’s and the early to mid-1980’s we were a running team. We threw the ball 6-8 times per game to keep the defense honest. From the mid-1980’s through the present we’ve become more air oriented.

Meno-SW

Passing Through the Years
Our passing game has increased not only the amount of times we throw, but the number of pass plays we now have at our disposal. The one thing that has remained constant through the years is the 49 Short Option Pass. This play is our bread-and-butter play along with our power off-tackle play, 48 Blast. Continue reading Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

As I go over my spread quad series I am going to relate this offense to a chess board, specifically to the end game of a chess match.

While teaching chess I usually start by making sure players understand the end game as soon as possible. Studies have shown that kids enjoy chess much more when they know how to finish off a game when they get the lead.

Teaching end game in chess is very simple because I use the same strategies that I do when I am coaching on the field of battle in football. In chess once you get to the end game you have fewer pieces and need to examine the entire board to evaluate where your players are versus the other player’s pieces on the board.

I have been a traditionalist when it comes to single wing football which means that I tend to see single wing football very narrowly minded. Change is not one of those things that I have been taught to employ while running a true power single wing formation. So when I began devising a spread single wing attack, I wanted to make sure I was sticking with what I was taught to believe to be TRUE single wing football.

The following is a list of items which I believe are unchangeable single wing elements that must be employed in my quad spread single wing attack: Continue reading Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Howard Jones Birdcage Shift

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football. 

I am taking the opportunity to write about Howard Jones. This great coach is one of my favorite single wing coaches. I will discuss and illustrate his “Birdcage Shift”. His teams shifted into numerous formations from the “Birdcage”.

Jones is one the few to coach teams at 3 different schools to undefeated seasons. In fact, does any one know another coach who did this feat? (Direct Snap note: Gil Dobie did the feat at North Dakota State, Washington and Cornell) Jones’ 1909 Yale team, 1921 and 1922 Iowa teams, and many USC teams went undefeated. Jones’ USC teams were 5-0 in the Rose Bowl. This feat by his teams earned Jones the nickname “King if the Rose Bowl”.

Jones use unique terminology in his single wing system. He called the traditional single wing tailback the “quarterback.” Mark Bliss is a coach who does the same as Jones. I may be mistaken, but I believe Jim Ahern uses this term, too. Jones called the traditional single wing blocking back the “left halfback” or “inside halfback”. Jones called the traditional single wing wingback the “right halfback” or “outside halfback.” Jones called the left guard or inside guard the “running guard”. This is due to the fact that he pulled on nearly every play.

The “Birdcage Shift” allowed Jones’ teams to shift into numerous formations prior to the pause before the snap of the ball. A glaring drawback to shift was the inability to snap the ball on a quick count. This was due to not starting out with seven men on the line of scrimmage. You started out with only four men on the line of scrimmage. There are four other men who are stacked behind the first line of four men. The remaining three men are stacked at the top of the 4-4-3 configured “birdcage”. Continue reading Howard Jones Birdcage Shift

The Spinner S’Wing T Offense

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football. 

After 22 years as the Head Football Coach at Western Branch High School here in Chesapeake, VA, I retired after the 2006 season. We ran the Delaware Wing T offense for the last 19 years of my career and had great success with it. I even created a spread shotgun version of the Wing T that proved to be highly successful for us the last 6 years that I coached Varsity.

I took the 2007 season off but found myself missing working with the kids. The rest of the headaches were not something I missed but the daily interaction with the players made me hungry to get back into coaching. A friend of mine, who was also a former coach, is the Principal at our local middle school. He offered me the opportunity to get back into coaching at that level. My pastor calls it: “Football Lite… less filling!” I get all the fun of working with teenagers with a minimum of the stress and aggravation that comes with coaching at the high school level.

Upon being hired, I decided that this was going to be “fun” so we were going to run a “fun” offense. After consulting several Single Wing coaches and web sites (especially this one, Direct Snap), I came up with a concept where I combined the plays and blocking rules of Delaware Wing T football with the principles of the Single Wing attack. Thus, the moniker Spinner S(ingle)’ Wing T offense.

I would like to share some of the basics that we used and if you are interested, contact me via email and we can talk more.

LJ-Formation

We ran an unbalanced line (with the unbalanced to the right only) with a wide receiver to that side. Our splits were 6 inches, which meant basically foot to foot! The SE’s width was anywhere from 5 yards from the “Power Tackle” to 15 yards wide.  Our TE aligned to the weak side and was an eligible receiver. Continue reading The Spinner S’Wing T Offense

Weak Side Attack in the Unbalanced Single Wing

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

Strengthening Your Weak Side Attack From the Unbalanced Line Single Wing

Defensive coaches are very quick to counter the unbalanced Single Wing formation by stepping down the DLs and LBs to take away the power advantage of the offense’s strong side. Unless the offense can out-athlete the defense, our reasons for attacking with an unbalanced formation have been somewhat diminished. To counter, the offense must have an effective weak side attack. Gaining positive yardage weak side on a consistent basis will result in further adjustments from the defense. In turn, the strong side game benefits.

First off, the plays about to be discussed are in no way ‘my creation’. I owe all of my Single Wing knowledge to reading Ken Kueffel, speaking with and reading the information provided by John Aldrich, as well as a lot of information shared by John Ward and others. While there is nothing mentioned in the this article which is earth shattering, I hope it assists you in improving your offensive attack.

The play-calling terminology is as follows: The Quarterback (FB in traditional terms) is the ‘1′ back, the Tailback is the ‘2′ back, the Wingback is the ‘3′ back, and the Fullback (Blocking Back in traditional terms) is the ‘4′ back. Our hole numbering system is Even Right/Odd Left. The first number of the call tells the Center where to snap the ball, the second number is the Back running the ball, and the third number is the hole for the play.

For simplicity, all of the plays are diagrammed as having the defense ’step down’ its players out of a 52 defensive package. Continue reading Weak Side Attack in the Unbalanced Single Wing