Tag Archives: misdirection

Power Opposite Motion

“Does anyone know the plays at left tackle?”  Like many small high schools, our junior varsity team often consists of whatever bodies are available.  So, we play many junior varsity games with several starters playing ‘new’ positions.  And more than a few of these guys are the same ones running laps for not paying attention during practice.  So for obvious reasons our junior varsity playbook is pretty slim and most games we have to try to make our living running power and wedge.  And while we aren’t exactly blessed with huge numbers in our program, we make up for it by not being blessed with an abundance of talent, speed or size.

So we usually find it tough to just line up and run right at the defense over and over and over each game.  The truth is there are very few football teams at any level who can get away with just lining up and running right at the defense every down.  You need to get creative and use some smoke and mirrors.  You need to run some form of counter.

Whether you choose counter, counter criss-cross or reverse you are going to need quite a bit of practice time to perfect what is essentially a completely different scheme with completely different techniques.  If you do not have the time, or perhaps the experience, then running ‘Power Opposite Motion’ may be the counter play for you.  Or if you already have one or more counter plays installed this might allow you to add yet another counter play with minimal effort.

01 - rip66superpower

Running power opposite motion was an evolutionary process.  We were a Wyatt terminology team using gap-down-backer as our main blocking scheme.  When we first began running the Double Wing in 2004 we started with the basic power play (Rip 66 Super Power, above).  Rip motion refers to the left wingback (A back) would go in orbit motion to the right, while the right wingback’s motion was referred to as LIZ motion. Continue reading Power Opposite Motion

Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Every year several different discussions will pop up on the various football forums surrounding what some call a trick play and others call a hidden hand-off or even misdirection.  I have seen this play given many names including Wrap Around Draw, Ghost Trap, Ghost Draw, Pimp Juice and even just FB Draw.  The basics of the play are quite simple but it can have devastating effects when executed correctly.

Whether the QB is under center (most people run it from this type of formation) or in the shotgun, the QB either drops back or rolls out to show pass (some coaches even have their linemen yell pass to confuse the defense and add to the fake of the QB).  At the snap of the ball the FB will take his position (this will depend on the formation or offense you are running) and settle in with one hand on his far hip creating a pocket and his off side hand resting in front of the pocket to help ensure the ball doesn’t get pushed too far through the pocket.  This technique is demonstrated here:

As you can see, even with no other players in view the actual exchange is quite difficult to see no matter the angle you are viewing it from.  As it occurs faster and faster in the technique video the exchange becomes almost invisible.  Of course it is extremely important for the FB to pause and sit still with the ball on his hip while the defenders’ eyes follow the QB farther and farther away from the ‘new’ ball carrier.  Then once he can afford to wait no longer, he must explode up the field and gain as many yards as possible.  As you will see in the video examples below, the more patient the FB, the more effective the play tends to be.  Of course it helps for the FB to have some speed for once he is in the open field but it can work with slower FBs as well. Continue reading Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Fake Fumble Wedge Play

For many Double Wing or Single Wing Coaches, one of the staples of their offense is the Mighty Wedge Play.  While it seems to be more popular at the youth level than in High School, I feel safe in saying that it belongs in the playbook of any offense that utilizes zero to six inch splits along their offensive line.  I know we used it to great effect when I was coaching at the HS level a few years ago and it has always been a big part of our offense when I coach youth teams.

Like many other plays, Wedge can be run many different ways. Some of the more common I have seen over the years are:

  • On 1st Sound
  • With XX action
  • With Rocket Sweep action 

Another version of this great play that I have used a few times over the years is the Fake Fumble Wedge.  The basic idea is to have the QB or another RB fake like they fumbled the ball to draw attention from the defense while the actual ball carrier and the offensive linemen are rumbling down the field. Continue reading Fake Fumble Wedge Play

Top 5 Reasons To Run DW

I have run the DW for about 15 years now and over the years I have mixed it with Wishbone and Straight T and Wing T for various reasons.  But I always end up coming home to the DTDW.  Here are the top 5 reasons:

1 Power Play – The play that our offense is built around is the most powerful off tackle play in all of football.

Toss Continue reading Top 5 Reasons To Run DW