Tag Archives: hs

Elephant Package – Gulf Coast Offense

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.          Special thanks to Danny Spain for contacting Coach Hicks

The Gulf Coast Offense (GCO) is a hybrid spread no-huddle offense, which allows us to control the tempo of the game while utilizing numerous styles in our attack. We have blended multiple offensive systems into what we think is the future of offensive football. The GCO has taken concepts from many styles including the R&S, wishbone option, single-wing, and others and molded them into a cohesive system that relies on deception. The GCO is willing to take what a defense is giving us and work against its strength. Our staff and myself really have checked our egos at the door, and are not willing to pound a square peg into a round hole. We go into each game with our basic game plan of running and throwing the football. In my Zen mind I believe balance is the best way to attack a defense and a defensive coordinator. The more elements you make a defense have to prepare for and play against, the more distinct an advantage your offense is allowed.

This is where the single-wing has become a huge part of our offense and our success. For years I have been based out of the four wide receivers and one back set which has been a wonderful and simple plan to attack a defense. With the evolution of defenses and the amount of so-called spread offenses, we felt we needed to add another element to our offensive attack.

Elephant-1

I went into deep study and discovered the “Yale” or “Beast” formation and immediately added it to our offensive assault, with the thought that it would add a short yardage/goal line addition to our package that we could use only when needed. Well that was the initial plan of attack. Continue reading Elephant Package – Gulf Coast Offense

Weak Side Attack in the Unbalanced Single Wing

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

Strengthening Your Weak Side Attack From the Unbalanced Line Single Wing

Defensive coaches are very quick to counter the unbalanced Single Wing formation by stepping down the DLs and LBs to take away the power advantage of the offense’s strong side. Unless the offense can out-athlete the defense, our reasons for attacking with an unbalanced formation have been somewhat diminished. To counter, the offense must have an effective weak side attack. Gaining positive yardage weak side on a consistent basis will result in further adjustments from the defense. In turn, the strong side game benefits.

First off, the plays about to be discussed are in no way ‘my creation’. I owe all of my Single Wing knowledge to reading Ken Kueffel, speaking with and reading the information provided by John Aldrich, as well as a lot of information shared by John Ward and others. While there is nothing mentioned in the this article which is earth shattering, I hope it assists you in improving your offensive attack.

The play-calling terminology is as follows: The Quarterback (FB in traditional terms) is the ‘1′ back, the Tailback is the ‘2′ back, the Wingback is the ‘3′ back, and the Fullback (Blocking Back in traditional terms) is the ‘4′ back. Our hole numbering system is Even Right/Odd Left. The first number of the call tells the Center where to snap the ball, the second number is the Back running the ball, and the third number is the hole for the play.

For simplicity, all of the plays are diagrammed as having the defense ’step down’ its players out of a 52 defensive package. Continue reading Weak Side Attack in the Unbalanced Single Wing

Integral Bunch Pass Route Packages

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

The following materials are intended to supplement the presentation I gave at the 2007 Single Wing Conclave in Wilkes-Barre, PA, although I believe they also stand on their own in discussing the Y Stick/Turn and Bunch Mesh/Under route packages. While I diagram them from unbalanced line single wing formation, these packages are applicable to any Bunched formation where three receivers are in close proximity to each other at the snap (i.e., within 5 yards of each other).

The first pass route package, which is known as Y Stick or Turn, is essentially a ball-control package, albeit with a deep shot built in. It is among the highest-percentage route packages I know of, and will deliver 7-9 yard gains with low risk on a very regular basis…and that is if your opponents are playing good pass defense. While it is designed to attack the underneath coverage in zone defenses, it can also be useful against man coverage.

The other package, Bunch Mesh/Under, is the latest version of the Bunch Mesh route package from the fertile mind of Coach Andrew Coverdale. He now prefers it to the original Mesh package he has been teaching since the mid-90’s. It is easier to install and to read, and provides good answers to both man and zone coverage.

I have had success with both of these pass route packages down to the age of 8, and they are both staples in modern passing attacks at every level up to and including the NFL. I’ll be happy to answer questions about either or both, and about the pass protection schemes I discuss — e-mail me at seayee at hotmail dot com.

Y Stick/Turn

Play_63_SW

Continue reading Integral Bunch Pass Route Packages

Blitz The Option

“You gotta play assignment football!”

“Do your job! You’ve got Dive! You’ve got Quarterback! You’ve got Pitch!”

“You have to stay in base and be disciplined!”

Sound familiar?  If you get most coaches talking about how to defend the option, you’ll got responses similar to the ones above.

Problem is…that approach is wrong.

There…I said it. Continue reading Blitz The Option

A ‘Ballsy’ Fake Punt

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

The football season of 2006 was a very interesting one for me. It was my first season back coaching high school football after spending the previous 6 coaching at a junior college. It would also mark the first time in 2 years that I would not be running the single wing. I was hired as the Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator and we would be running the mid-line/triple option.

As we began to prepare for the season the task of running special teams came around. We split up the responsibilities amongst the staff and I wound up with the punt and kick off return teams. Having previously been a special teams coordinator, I was excited to put in schemes I had successfully used before. While putting in the punt team we also put in our fakes. Our head coach showed me a punt fake that he had learned while at another school and I fell in love with it right away! We called it “BALLSY”! It had all the makings of a great single wing play. Continue reading A ‘Ballsy’ Fake Punt