Category Archives: Single Wing

Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Every year several different discussions will pop up on the various football forums surrounding what some call a trick play and others call a hidden hand-off or even misdirection.  I have seen this play given many names including Wrap Around Draw, Ghost Trap, Ghost Draw, Pimp Juice and even just FB Draw.  The basics of the play are quite simple but it can have devastating effects when executed correctly.

Whether the QB is under center (most people run it from this type of formation) or in the shotgun, the QB either drops back or rolls out to show pass (some coaches even have their linemen yell pass to confuse the defense and add to the fake of the QB).  At the snap of the ball the FB will take his position (this will depend on the formation or offense you are running) and settle in with one hand on his far hip creating a pocket and his off side hand resting in front of the pocket to help ensure the ball doesn’t get pushed too far through the pocket.  This technique is demonstrated here:

As you can see, even with no other players in view the actual exchange is quite difficult to see no matter the angle you are viewing it from.  As it occurs faster and faster in the technique video the exchange becomes almost invisible.  Of course it is extremely important for the FB to pause and sit still with the ball on his hip while the defenders’ eyes follow the QB farther and farther away from the ‘new’ ball carrier.  Then once he can afford to wait no longer, he must explode up the field and gain as many yards as possible.  As you will see in the video examples below, the more patient the FB, the more effective the play tends to be.  Of course it helps for the FB to have some speed for once he is in the open field but it can work with slower FBs as well. Continue reading Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

In the Beginning

Since the beginning of time…or at least since 1966, Menominee has run the single wing under Ken Hofer. In the late 1960’s, 1970’s and the early to mid-1980’s we were a running team. We threw the ball 6-8 times per game to keep the defense honest. From the mid-1980’s through the present we’ve become more air oriented.

Meno-SW

Passing Through the Years
Our passing game has increased not only the amount of times we throw, but the number of pass plays we now have at our disposal. The one thing that has remained constant through the years is the 49 Short Option Pass. This play is our bread-and-butter play along with our power off-tackle play, 48 Blast. Continue reading Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

As I go over my spread quad series I am going to relate this offense to a chess board, specifically to the end game of a chess match.

While teaching chess I usually start by making sure players understand the end game as soon as possible. Studies have shown that kids enjoy chess much more when they know how to finish off a game when they get the lead.

Teaching end game in chess is very simple because I use the same strategies that I do when I am coaching on the field of battle in football. In chess once you get to the end game you have fewer pieces and need to examine the entire board to evaluate where your players are versus the other player’s pieces on the board.

I have been a traditionalist when it comes to single wing football which means that I tend to see single wing football very narrowly minded. Change is not one of those things that I have been taught to employ while running a true power single wing formation. So when I began devising a spread single wing attack, I wanted to make sure I was sticking with what I was taught to believe to be TRUE single wing football.

The following is a list of items which I believe are unchangeable single wing elements that must be employed in my quad spread single wing attack: Continue reading Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Ideas From Inside the Tulsa Formation

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

Adam asked me a couple of months ago to write few words about the Tulsa Box, and I am committed to that, but I thought I would take you on a little detour for a few moments and give you a little background on my “drug” habit. I have been following the Single Wing since the winter of 1995 when I was coaching at the local middle school in my hometown. Once discovered, I spent more time tinkering and drawing plays, formations, and entertained just about every crazy idea that popped into my skull.

I mostly blame my mother-in-law for the obsession because it was during the spring when she told me that she had located John Aldrich’s book, The Single Wing and the Spinning Fullback at a high school in York, PA of all places. I kept the book on inter-library loan for weeks and it didn’t take me long to create and install a brief version complete with simplistic blocking rules, and a couple of formations. The results were nothing short of remarkable. My kids played extremely well and they loved the Single Wing!

The end result of my initial work was being offered a job at the varsity level with a new incoming head coach. He was the freshman coach and we scrimmaged each other on a few occasions. Our kids battled each other and I tried to stick it to him every chance I got. He took my aggression in good stride and approached me about my methods, my results, and convinced me that I would make a good varsity coach. He was wrong! I was awful because his system was not sound, I was too outspoken about the Single Wing, and because I couldn’t keep my big mouth shut; we endured a beating that season. My undermining was a big reason why we finished 0–10. In our last game we dressed 28 kids against one of the best teams in the mid-state and were shellacked 72–0, including a sophomore girl kicking the last 5 PATs. We needed binoculars to see the opposing 20-yard line. To this day, I remember the feeling of embarrassment as we crossed the field to shake hands. I was dying inside because the program I loved and had played for as a kid, was crumbling, and I couldn’t stop it. Continue reading Ideas From Inside the Tulsa Formation

Bruce Eien – Fat Formation

Coach Eien has always given freely of his materials and has long been known as a Single Wing Guru on the west coast of the country. And since his Fat Formation Video Playbook has been one of the most popular blog posts in the history of this website, I decided recently that I should reach out to Coach Eien and ask if he would be willing to write a little more in-depth article about this very simple yet powerful offensive system.  And not only was he willing to write up an article, but he KNOCKED IT OUT OF THE PARK.  Sure you can find most of these concepts spread out around the internet as well as on his Fat Formation Blog, but I havent seen it all consolidated into such a nice concise little article.

Basic FAT Formations

The two basic formations are Single and Double Fat. The main advantage to Single Fat is the same player is always the kick out block.  This allows for a bigger, stronger player to be the lead block and allow for a faster, shiftier player to play in the backfield as a blocker and runner.  The main advantage of Double Fat is it adds a FB game with a lead blocker for the Power and Sweep Plays.

Single Fat

Formation 1 - Single Fat 

Double Fat

Formation 2 - Double Fat 

Basic FAT Running Plays

The base plays are enough for an entire offense.  There is a combination of power, speed, misdirection and play action passing.  The base run plays are Blast, Power, Sweep, Wham (Counter) and Shooter (Wedge). The defense cannot effectively cover all the areas these plays hit.  The main objective in play calling is find where they are weak and exploit that area.

Blast

Run Play 1 - Blast Continue reading Bruce Eien – Fat Formation