Category Archives: Playbook

Power Opposite Motion

“Does anyone know the plays at left tackle?”  Like many small high schools, our junior varsity team often consists of whatever bodies are available.  So, we play many junior varsity games with several starters playing ‘new’ positions.  And more than a few of these guys are the same ones running laps for not paying attention during practice.  So for obvious reasons our junior varsity playbook is pretty slim and most games we have to try to make our living running power and wedge.  And while we aren’t exactly blessed with huge numbers in our program, we make up for it by not being blessed with an abundance of talent, speed or size.

So we usually find it tough to just line up and run right at the defense over and over and over each game.  The truth is there are very few football teams at any level who can get away with just lining up and running right at the defense every down.  You need to get creative and use some smoke and mirrors.  You need to run some form of counter.

Whether you choose counter, counter criss-cross or reverse you are going to need quite a bit of practice time to perfect what is essentially a completely different scheme with completely different techniques.  If you do not have the time, or perhaps the experience, then running ‘Power Opposite Motion’ may be the counter play for you.  Or if you already have one or more counter plays installed this might allow you to add yet another counter play with minimal effort.

01 - rip66superpower

Running power opposite motion was an evolutionary process.  We were a Wyatt terminology team using gap-down-backer as our main blocking scheme.  When we first began running the Double Wing in 2004 we started with the basic power play (Rip 66 Super Power, above).  Rip motion refers to the left wingback (A back) would go in orbit motion to the right, while the right wingback’s motion was referred to as LIZ motion. Continue reading Power Opposite Motion

Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

In the Beginning

Since the beginning of time…or at least since 1966, Menominee has run the single wing under Ken Hofer. In the late 1960’s, 1970’s and the early to mid-1980’s we were a running team. We threw the ball 6-8 times per game to keep the defense honest. From the mid-1980’s through the present we’ve become more air oriented.

Meno-SW

Passing Through the Years
Our passing game has increased not only the amount of times we throw, but the number of pass plays we now have at our disposal. The one thing that has remained constant through the years is the 49 Short Option Pass. This play is our bread-and-butter play along with our power off-tackle play, 48 Blast. Continue reading Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

Ideas From Inside the Tulsa Formation

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

Adam asked me a couple of months ago to write few words about the Tulsa Box, and I am committed to that, but I thought I would take you on a little detour for a few moments and give you a little background on my “drug” habit. I have been following the Single Wing since the winter of 1995 when I was coaching at the local middle school in my hometown. Once discovered, I spent more time tinkering and drawing plays, formations, and entertained just about every crazy idea that popped into my skull.

I mostly blame my mother-in-law for the obsession because it was during the spring when she told me that she had located John Aldrich’s book, The Single Wing and the Spinning Fullback at a high school in York, PA of all places. I kept the book on inter-library loan for weeks and it didn’t take me long to create and install a brief version complete with simplistic blocking rules, and a couple of formations. The results were nothing short of remarkable. My kids played extremely well and they loved the Single Wing!

The end result of my initial work was being offered a job at the varsity level with a new incoming head coach. He was the freshman coach and we scrimmaged each other on a few occasions. Our kids battled each other and I tried to stick it to him every chance I got. He took my aggression in good stride and approached me about my methods, my results, and convinced me that I would make a good varsity coach. He was wrong! I was awful because his system was not sound, I was too outspoken about the Single Wing, and because I couldn’t keep my big mouth shut; we endured a beating that season. My undermining was a big reason why we finished 0–10. In our last game we dressed 28 kids against one of the best teams in the mid-state and were shellacked 72–0, including a sophomore girl kicking the last 5 PATs. We needed binoculars to see the opposing 20-yard line. To this day, I remember the feeling of embarrassment as we crossed the field to shake hands. I was dying inside because the program I loved and had played for as a kid, was crumbling, and I couldn’t stop it. Continue reading Ideas From Inside the Tulsa Formation

Bruce Eien – Fat Formation

Coach Eien has always given freely of his materials and has long been known as a Single Wing Guru on the west coast of the country. And since his Fat Formation Video Playbook has been one of the most popular blog posts in the history of this website, I decided recently that I should reach out to Coach Eien and ask if he would be willing to write a little more in-depth article about this very simple yet powerful offensive system.  And not only was he willing to write up an article, but he KNOCKED IT OUT OF THE PARK.  Sure you can find most of these concepts spread out around the internet as well as on his Fat Formation Blog, but I havent seen it all consolidated into such a nice concise little article.

Basic FAT Formations

The two basic formations are Single and Double Fat. The main advantage to Single Fat is the same player is always the kick out block.  This allows for a bigger, stronger player to be the lead block and allow for a faster, shiftier player to play in the backfield as a blocker and runner.  The main advantage of Double Fat is it adds a FB game with a lead blocker for the Power and Sweep Plays.

Single Fat

Formation 1 - Single Fat 

Double Fat

Formation 2 - Double Fat 

Basic FAT Running Plays

The base plays are enough for an entire offense.  There is a combination of power, speed, misdirection and play action passing.  The base run plays are Blast, Power, Sweep, Wham (Counter) and Shooter (Wedge). The defense cannot effectively cover all the areas these plays hit.  The main objective in play calling is find where they are weak and exploit that area.

Blast

Run Play 1 - Blast Continue reading Bruce Eien – Fat Formation

Elephant Package – Gulf Coast Offense

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.          Special thanks to Danny Spain for contacting Coach Hicks

The Gulf Coast Offense (GCO) is a hybrid spread no-huddle offense, which allows us to control the tempo of the game while utilizing numerous styles in our attack. We have blended multiple offensive systems into what we think is the future of offensive football. The GCO has taken concepts from many styles including the R&S, wishbone option, single-wing, and others and molded them into a cohesive system that relies on deception. The GCO is willing to take what a defense is giving us and work against its strength. Our staff and myself really have checked our egos at the door, and are not willing to pound a square peg into a round hole. We go into each game with our basic game plan of running and throwing the football. In my Zen mind I believe balance is the best way to attack a defense and a defensive coordinator. The more elements you make a defense have to prepare for and play against, the more distinct an advantage your offense is allowed.

This is where the single-wing has become a huge part of our offense and our success. For years I have been based out of the four wide receivers and one back set which has been a wonderful and simple plan to attack a defense. With the evolution of defenses and the amount of so-called spread offenses, we felt we needed to add another element to our offensive attack.

Elephant-1

I went into deep study and discovered the “Yale” or “Beast” formation and immediately added it to our offensive assault, with the thought that it would add a short yardage/goal line addition to our package that we could use only when needed. Well that was the initial plan of attack. Continue reading Elephant Package – Gulf Coast Offense