Category Archives: Double Wing

Power Opposite Motion

“Does anyone know the plays at left tackle?”  Like many small high schools, our junior varsity team often consists of whatever bodies are available.  So, we play many junior varsity games with several starters playing ‘new’ positions.  And more than a few of these guys are the same ones running laps for not paying attention during practice.  So for obvious reasons our junior varsity playbook is pretty slim and most games we have to try to make our living running power and wedge.  And while we aren’t exactly blessed with huge numbers in our program, we make up for it by not being blessed with an abundance of talent, speed or size.

So we usually find it tough to just line up and run right at the defense over and over and over each game.  The truth is there are very few football teams at any level who can get away with just lining up and running right at the defense every down.  You need to get creative and use some smoke and mirrors.  You need to run some form of counter.

Whether you choose counter, counter criss-cross or reverse you are going to need quite a bit of practice time to perfect what is essentially a completely different scheme with completely different techniques.  If you do not have the time, or perhaps the experience, then running ‘Power Opposite Motion’ may be the counter play for you.  Or if you already have one or more counter plays installed this might allow you to add yet another counter play with minimal effort.

01 - rip66superpower

Running power opposite motion was an evolutionary process.  We were a Wyatt terminology team using gap-down-backer as our main blocking scheme.  When we first began running the Double Wing in 2004 we started with the basic power play (Rip 66 Super Power, above).  Rip motion refers to the left wingback (A back) would go in orbit motion to the right, while the right wingback’s motion was referred to as LIZ motion. Continue reading Power Opposite Motion

Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Every year several different discussions will pop up on the various football forums surrounding what some call a trick play and others call a hidden hand-off or even misdirection.  I have seen this play given many names including Wrap Around Draw, Ghost Trap, Ghost Draw, Pimp Juice and even just FB Draw.  The basics of the play are quite simple but it can have devastating effects when executed correctly.

Whether the QB is under center (most people run it from this type of formation) or in the shotgun, the QB either drops back or rolls out to show pass (some coaches even have their linemen yell pass to confuse the defense and add to the fake of the QB).  At the snap of the ball the FB will take his position (this will depend on the formation or offense you are running) and settle in with one hand on his far hip creating a pocket and his off side hand resting in front of the pocket to help ensure the ball doesn’t get pushed too far through the pocket.  This technique is demonstrated here:

As you can see, even with no other players in view the actual exchange is quite difficult to see no matter the angle you are viewing it from.  As it occurs faster and faster in the technique video the exchange becomes almost invisible.  Of course it is extremely important for the FB to pause and sit still with the ball on his hip while the defenders’ eyes follow the QB farther and farther away from the ‘new’ ball carrier.  Then once he can afford to wait no longer, he must explode up the field and gain as many yards as possible.  As you will see in the video examples below, the more patient the FB, the more effective the play tends to be.  Of course it helps for the FB to have some speed for once he is in the open field but it can work with slower FBs as well. Continue reading Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Half Line Drills For Double Wing Power Schemes

So one of the complaints I used to have as a ‘newbie’ Double Wing Coach was our inability to get live reps for our offensive line without setting up a scrimmage with another team.  You see in youth football we often have only 16-18 kids (several of which don’t give you much competition against your starters), making it difficult to work live with your linemen to develop their footwork for blocking plays.  And of course the Double Wing offense has 11 moving parts and the plays just don’t operate the same without 11 on offense.  So now you need 11 on defense to get them a decent look to go up against and now you have a numbers problem.  So I felt we had to find a way to simulate a live play with just half the available players.

Just so you know about our version of the Double Wing, we use a TKO blocking scheme for Power, Counter and Trap and of course the Wedge blocking scheme for Wedge and we use a variation of a Reach blocking scheme to get outside.  Wedge we found was pretty easy to practice by using a Coach for the O-line to push against and this was actually for the safety of our players as well because that Wedge play really grinds up any Defensive Linemen who happen to get in the way.  And of course when we run outside we don’t really get everyone involved so we could practice that pretty easily.  But our Power Off-tackle scheme really does involve all 11 players and that is why it is so devastating.

I also realize that some guys use ‘rules’ blocking instead of TKO (we used that for many years as well) and I can assure you that these drills will also work great for your team.  You can even get some practice reps for your X or G plays as well.  

The first drill I am diagramming is our WALL DRILL. It is used mostly to work on our TKO wall blocking.

Half-Line-Wall-Drill Continue reading Half Line Drills For Double Wing Power Schemes

The Spinner S’Wing T Offense

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football. 

After 22 years as the Head Football Coach at Western Branch High School here in Chesapeake, VA, I retired after the 2006 season. We ran the Delaware Wing T offense for the last 19 years of my career and had great success with it. I even created a spread shotgun version of the Wing T that proved to be highly successful for us the last 6 years that I coached Varsity.

I took the 2007 season off but found myself missing working with the kids. The rest of the headaches were not something I missed but the daily interaction with the players made me hungry to get back into coaching. A friend of mine, who was also a former coach, is the Principal at our local middle school. He offered me the opportunity to get back into coaching at that level. My pastor calls it: “Football Lite… less filling!” I get all the fun of working with teenagers with a minimum of the stress and aggravation that comes with coaching at the high school level.

Upon being hired, I decided that this was going to be “fun” so we were going to run a “fun” offense. After consulting several Single Wing coaches and web sites (especially this one, Direct Snap), I came up with a concept where I combined the plays and blocking rules of Delaware Wing T football with the principles of the Single Wing attack. Thus, the moniker Spinner S(ingle)’ Wing T offense.

I would like to share some of the basics that we used and if you are interested, contact me via email and we can talk more.

LJ-Formation

We ran an unbalanced line (with the unbalanced to the right only) with a wide receiver to that side. Our splits were 6 inches, which meant basically foot to foot! The SE’s width was anywhere from 5 yards from the “Power Tackle” to 15 yards wide.  Our TE aligned to the weak side and was an eligible receiver. Continue reading The Spinner S’Wing T Offense

Direct Snap Double Wing Playbook

About 1998 I became very interested in researching the single wing and I was constantly searching the Internet looking for information on the offense. I was on a reference material hunt about this great offense, and having grown up in Menominee, MI, home of Coach Ken Hofer’s single wing, I wanted to learn more. In someways it became an obsession.

After collecting other direct snap books through inter-library loan, trading video tapes, bookmarking websites, I came to the realization that I needed an outlet for my newly acquired knowledge. In the summer of 2000, I threw my application into the local Pop Warner coaching circles in Green Bay, WI. To my surprise I was chosen as a head coach. I was expecting/hoping for an offensive coordinator position at best. I did not have a son playing, he was two years old at the time, nor did I play high school football, but I wanted to give coaching a try. I felt like it was my responsibility to show the Green Bay area that the single wing was alive.

This became more than a hobby of researching the single wing, it became the responsibility of a whole team of young players. I needed to figure out which version of a direct snap offense I wanted to use. After e-mailing back and forth with a few new coaching friends across the country I decided to give the direct snap, double wing with an unbalanced line offense a go. I figured I wanted to spread the work load around, so two wingbacks seemed the way to go. With the help of a coaching colleague and the Tierney and Gray book, The New Doublewing Attack, my 10 play offense was ready to go.

 DW-Formation

Continue reading Direct Snap Double Wing Playbook