Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Every year several different discussions will pop up on the various football forums surrounding what some call a trick play and others call a hidden hand-off or even misdirection.  I have seen this play given many names including Wrap Around Draw, Ghost Trap, Ghost Draw, Pimp Juice and even just FB Draw.  The basics of the play are quite simple but it can have devastating effects when executed correctly.

Whether the QB is under center (most people run it from this type of formation) or in the shotgun, the QB either drops back or rolls out to show pass (some coaches even have their linemen yell pass to confuse the defense and add to the fake of the QB).  At the snap of the ball the FB will take his position (this will depend on the formation or offense you are running) and settle in with one hand on his far hip creating a pocket and his off side hand resting in front of the pocket to help ensure the ball doesn’t get pushed too far through the pocket.  This technique is demonstrated here:

As you can see, even with no other players in view the actual exchange is quite difficult to see no matter the angle you are viewing it from.  As it occurs faster and faster in the technique video the exchange becomes almost invisible.  Of course it is extremely important for the FB to pause and sit still with the ball on his hip while the defenders’ eyes follow the QB farther and farther away from the ‘new’ ball carrier.  Then once he can afford to wait no longer, he must explode up the field and gain as many yards as possible.  As you will see in the video examples below, the more patient the FB, the more effective the play tends to be.  Of course it helps for the FB to have some speed for once he is in the open field but it can work with slower FBs as well.

As far as blocking schemes for this play, they appear to be as varied as the offenses you can run it from.  Some coaches like to use a simple Trap Block, others prefer to use a Draw Scheme and still others use no scheme but instead rely on the defense to overplay the QB and ignore the FB until it is too late.  But they all use the same behind the back exchange to hide the ball from the defense.

Below are some examples of this play from different teams and offenses and even different eras:

In this next video at 19 seconds you can really see how patient the FB is and how wide open the field is because of his long pause.

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